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Cryptocurrency is a highly volatile and relatively new market / method of exchanging wealth. Whilst certain KYC (know your customer) legislation exists, the cryptocurrency medium is still in its infancy. It is attractive to money launderer’s as it provides a good medium to transfer wealth whilst not recognising borders and remaining pseudonymous. The rise of […]Continue reading

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There is an obligation for a registered health practitioner to notify the National Board for their profession (e.g. medical, dental, pharmacy etc) within 7 days of being charged with a criminal offence which is punishable by 12 months of imprisonment or more. Many criminal offences carry penalties punishable by 12 months imprisonment or more. As […]Continue reading

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Proceeds of Crime A Guide For Solicitors by Brian Walker, Barrister Clarence Chambers Level 21, 133 Castlereagh Street SYDNEY NSW 2000 (02) 9188 5251 admin@walkercriminallawyers.com.au an unedited version – December 2020 Information contained in this article is of a general nature only and should not be relied upon as concise legal advice. Contents History 4 […]Continue reading

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Section 24 of the Proceeds of Crimes Act 2002 (Cth) allows the defendant to apply for an allowance for living expenses amongst other things and in certain circumstances to be provided from restrained property. In the recent case of The Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police v Memon (No. 2) [2020] NSWSC 1636, a tender of evidence concerning […]Continue reading

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Reckless wounding is an offence pursuant to section 35 of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW) ‘Act’. A person that wounds any person and is reckless as to causing actual bodily harm to that or any other person, is guilty of an offence.[1] The maximum penalty for a conviction of reckless wounding is 7 years imprisonment. […]Continue reading

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What is a section 10? Section 10 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act provides for dismissal of charges and condition discharge of offender. The Act states that in a plea of guilt a court may dismiss ordering a conviction by making any one of the following orders: (a) an order directing that the relevant charge […]Continue reading

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Common assault is an offence pursuant to section 61 of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW) ‘Act’. This provision states whosoever assaults any person, although not occasioning actual bodily harm, shall be liable to imprisonment for two years. The maximum penalty for a conviction is therefore two years.[1] The case R v Burstow; R v Ireland [1998] 1 AC 147 […]Continue reading

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